CDC Data: 37% of females ages 13-17 Received the HPV Vaccine in 2008

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A report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) indicates the number of adolescent females receiving at least one dose of the HPV vaccine increased from 2007 to 2008, but coverage with the vaccine varied among ethnic, socioeconomic, and geographic lines.

Three teen girls

Merck’s HPV vaccine, Gardasil®, was approved by the FDA in 2006 for use with females ages 9-26. CDC recommends all females ages 11-12 routinely receive the vaccine, with “catch up” immunization for those ages 13-26 who haven’t received it. The vaccine is licensed for the prevention of cervical cancer, in addition to vulvar and vaginal cancers.

Through the National Immunization Survey-Teen (NIS-Teen), CDC conducts samples of teens ages 13-17 to estimate coverage of vaccines recommended for adolescents. The report detailing the most recent data, National, State, and Local Area Vaccination Coverage Among Adolescents Aged 13--17 Years --- United States, 2008 was published in the September 18th edition of MMWR. Key findings include:

The authors note that higher HPV vaccine uptake among poor women is important, given that cervical cancer disproportionately occurs in impoverished communities that lack access to health care, and suggest inclusion of the HPV vaccine in federally-funded programs (such as Vaccines for Children) explains why those of lower socioeconomic status have relatively high HPV vaccine coverage.

Reference:
S Stokley, C Dorell, D Yankey. National, State, and Local Area Vaccination Coverage Among Adolescents Aged 13--17 Years --- United States, 2008. MMWR, September 18, 2009 / 58(36);997-1001.